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UMI Celebrates Earth Day With A Dreamy And Relaxed New Single

Written by on April 24, 2020

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Photo by Spencer Middleton

Tierra Umi Wilson, better known as UMI, is back with her second new single in 2020, an ode to the connection between Earth and Mother.

The LA-based singer-songwriter returns with “Mother” just in time for Earth Day. The track explores the deep connection between Earth and Mother and their shared role as selfless creators and givers. “I hope that through this song we become more aware of our connection to Earth and our responsibility to protect it,” says UMI.

A gentle intimacy permeates the song as the listener floats through each verse. Muted and relaxed R&B-inspired drums lazily punctuate a dreamy keyboard line in a musical experience that feels like what glitter would sound like. UMI takes to her vocals with the same tender approach, creating an atmosphere of something as precious as the Mother and the Earth.

With lyrics like “Momma, don’t you cry anymore/ I know you just can’t fight and you’re sore/ I’m a mortal, and you just a light at your core,” UMI mourns the hurt applied to both Earth and Mother, while also celebrating all that they are.

At only 21 years old, UMI is already making waves within the music industry as a fresh and inventive vocalist, writer and producer. She often explores topics of race and intersectionality and, as a Japanese-African-American artist, how love is perceived through the lens of a mixed-race woman.

“Mother” is the second new track UMI has dropped in 2020 following “Picture Perfect” and both her 2019 visual EP Love Language (which she toured last fall with Conan Gray) and debut EP in 2018 Interlude. It’s the relaxing, peaceful song we needed right now.

If we can’t physically be sitting beside the ocean at sunrise with a cup of coffee in our hand, we can at least listen to “Mother” and feel like we are.


Follow UMI on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram!

Written By Shelby Kluver